Posts Tagged ‘Midwest Industrial’

What Do the New Coal Dust Rules Mean?

 Queenie-v/Flickr

Queenie-v/Flickr

Federal rules regarding coal dust were introduced last week, but what does this mean for coal companies? Read the rest of this entry »

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You Don’t Need to Pave Gravel Roads, Just Maintain Them

Chad Ohman/Flickr

Chad Ohman/Flickr

Is it better to continually maintain gravel roads or will paving them be more cost-effective? Read the rest of this entry »

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Access to Nature for All — on Nature’s Terms

MidwestPath

Paved surfaces are quite possibly the most prevalent human-made structures on the planet, and, as a result, the choice of what paving materials to use is a significant one. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Powder River Basin Coal Saga: How Can It Be Rectified?

Jerry Huddleston/Flickr

Jerry Huddleston/Flickr

Extreme winter weather causes trouble in transporting coal from one of the United States’ largest coal deposits. Read the rest of this entry »

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Who’s Responsible for Fixing Damaged Roadways in Ohio?

Anthony/Flickr

Anthony/Flickr

We explore the methodology behind Ohio’s Road Use Maintenance Act and how the agreements within will impact roads, companies and communities. Read the rest of this entry »

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It’s Time to Take Control of Dust From Gravel Roads

davebloggs007/Flickr

davebloggs007/Flickr

After much protest, the government of Newfoundland and Labrador will resume its dust control measures. Is this the start of change on a larger scale? Read the rest of this entry »

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West Coast’s Trucks Are a Concern for Coachella Residents

sergejf/Flickr

sergejf/Flickr

The West Coast mine, just north of Coachella, has been granted a permit to continue operations for 55 more years. We investigate the effects that this could have on traffic for the surrounding areas.
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Suppressing Dust on Gravel Roads

davebloggs007/Flickr

davebloggs007/Flickr

After much protest, the government of Newfoundland and Labrador will resume its dust control measures. Is this the start of change on a larger scale?
Read the rest of this entry »

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How to Control Air Pollution…Safely

Reports in recent weeks confirmed that oil sands are adding carcinogens to Canada’s Athabasca River. The good news in the bad news is that the carcinogens are being carried in the air, and air pollution can be controlled.

Given the importance of the oil sands to our economy and our future, the needed solution must absolutely stop dust clouds carrying airborne particulates. Reportedly, the particulates travel 50 kilometers, depositing possible contaminants on melted snow and in the Athabasca River. Dust blowing off the surfaces of big expanses at mines can be controlled – better yet, prevented – but stopping airborne particulates must not create any unintended consequences as those reported about the Athabasca River. That is why it is critical that agencies and businesses trying to control the air pollution that develops at their sites verify the effects the dust suppressants they use can have on the environment.  Today we have certified and verified environmental technologies (EnviroKleen® and EK35®) available that can stop airborne particulars.

Oil sands development located on the west bank of the Athabasca River. 28 February 2008. Photographs courtesy of Erin Kelly, published in Mongabay.com

Oil sands development located on the west bank of the Athabasca River. 28 February 2008. Photographs courtesy of Erin Kelly, published in Mongabay.com.

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The Threat of Unpaved Roads in Afghanistan

This CNN Q&A regarding the war in Afghanistan struck a chord with me.  The environmental difficulties our troops encounter is really unimaginable for most of us. Just reading this list of questions and answers caused me to stop and pause, almost tasting the “choking sandstorms” soldiers weather in the summer. In just a few sentences regarding their challenges, you cannot but be affected by the condition of unpaved roads and the threat they pose to our troops; much is being done and much more needs done to counter these conditions.  Midwest has helped the military in the past with similar dust issues, as illustrated by Major Steven A. Baker in this article published in Engineer - The Professional Bulletin of Army Engineers.

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